22nd August 2014 • comment

Article looks at the risk of dengue fever outbreaks in southern Europe as temperatures increase. Abstract Background Dengue fever is the most prevalent mosquito-borne viral disease worldwide. Dengue transmission is critically dependent on climatic factors and there is much concern as to whether climate change would spread the disease to areas currently unaffected. The occurrence of autochthonous infections in Croatia and France in 2010 has raised concerns about a potential re-emergence of dengue in Europe. The objective of this study is to estimate dengue risk in Europe under climate change scenarios. Methods We used a Generalized Additive Model (GAM) to estimate dengue fever risk as a function of climatic variables (maximum temperature, minimum temperature, precipitation, humidity) and socioeconomic factors (population density, urbanisation, GDP per capita and population size), under contemporary conditions (1985–2007) in Mexico. We then used our model estimates to project dengue incidence under baseline conditions (1961–1990) and three climate change scenarios: short-term 2011–2040, medium-term 2041–2070 and long-term 2071–2100 across Europe. The model was used to calculate average number of yearly dengue cases at a spatial resolution of 10 × 10 km grid covering all land surface of the currently 27 EU member states. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to model dengue fever risk in Europe in terms of disease occurrence rather than mosquito presence. Results The results were presented using Geographical Information System (GIS) and allowed identification of areas at high risk. Dengue fever hot spots were clustered around the coastal areas of the Mediterranean and Adriatic seas and the Po Valley in northern Italy. Conclusions This risk assessment study is likely to be a valuable tool assisting effective and targeted adaptation responses to reduce the likely increased burden of dengue fever in a warmer world.

9th March 2014 • comment

The primary objective of this project is to explore the rise of molecular technologies in cancer screening and monitoring and their impacts on the experience of cancer survivorship.

15th July 2013 • comment

Lives and careers of Caribbean teachers in the UK

by Lavia, Jennifer, Sikes, Pat

This research focuses on the lives and careers of Caribbean teachers who have migrated to the UK through recruitment schemes by the UK government to fill the breach in areas of shortage within UK schools. 

23rd March 2012 • comment

Research and writing looking at the doctoral examination process has tended to focus on the perceptions and experiences of students, the practicalities of the viva situation, or on the ways in which examiners read doctoral theses and come to decisions about what recommendation (e.g. Pass, Minor Amendments, Resubmission, Fail etc) to make. 

22nd March 2012 • comment