Review of articles on communication strategies for vector-borne diseases

22nd July 2016 • comment

Vector control, surveillance, drugs, diagnostics and vaccines all hold exciting potential but none can solve the problem alone. We need an integrated approach.

4th April 2016 • comment

The Zika virus appears to have emerged from nowhere, causing widespread health concerns throughout the world after decades of relative silence.

9th March 2016 • comment

The Zika virus is another wild card dealt to us by nature. It was first discovered in 1947.

17th February 2016 • comment

With Zika infection rates now seeming to be on the increase, the Oxford Science Blog talked to Professor Lang about why it is so important to develop capacity for doing research in places where research doesn't normally happen.

29th January 2016 • comment

Trudie Lang, Professor of Global Health at Oxford University and Head of The Global Health Network, and virologist Professor Jonathan Ball from Nottingham University discuss what we know so far.

29th January 2016 • comment

This Week in Global Health or TWiGH presents Global Health Out Loud with Sulzhan Bali & Jessica Taaffe. This week they discuss Zika virus.

25th January 2016 • comment

The increasing burden of dengue, and the relative failure of traditional vector control programs highlight the need to develop new control methods. SIT using self-limiting genetic technology is one such promising method. Abstract The increasing burden of dengue, and the relative failure of traditional vector control programs highlight the need to develop new control methods. SIT using self-limiting genetic technology is one such promising method. A self-limiting strain of Aedes aegypti, OX513A, has already reached the stage of field evaluation. Sustained releases of OX513A Ae. aegypti males led to 80% suppression of a target wild Ae. aegypti population in the Cayman Islands in 2010. Here we describe sustained series of field releases of OX513A Ae. aegypti males in a suburb of Juazeiro, Bahia, Brazil. This study spanned over a year and reduced the local Ae. aegypti population by 95% (95% CI: 92.2%-97.5%) based on adult trap data and 81% (95% CI: 74.9-85.2%) based on ovitrap indices compared to the adjacent no-release control area. The mating competitiveness of the released males (0.031; 95% CI: 0.025-0.036) was similar to that estimated in the Cayman trials (0.059; 95% CI: 0.011 - 0.210), indicating that environmental and target-strain differences had little impact on the mating success of the OX513A males. We conclude that sustained release of OX513A males may be an effective and widely useful method for suppression of the key dengue vector Ae. aegypti. The observed level of suppression would likely be sufficient to prevent dengue epidemics in the locality tested and other areas with similar or lower transmission.

14th July 2015 • comment